THE WILD NEEDS YOUR HELP

“Surge in poaching of endangered wildlife” reads a news article headline. Will you make the choice to be part of the protection team?

Funding animal protection

Our reserve has a comprehensive record of success stories in conservation. Our visitors and Lodge guests help make this happen when they visit the reserve. A portion of their fee for visiting and staying at the reserve goes toward subsidising the care and protection of the wildlife that inhabits the reserve with security, equipment and materials for maintenance.

With the onset of Coronavirus, the tourism industry has been struck an almost fatal blow. The lifeblood of funding that is provided by guests has been cut off, leaving the reserve with a very dire outlook and a shortfall in trying to care for its inhabitants.

RESERVE COSTS

ANTI POACHING UNIT

The Anti Poaching Unit is as essential to the reserve as oxygen to breathing. The roles performed by these wildlife warriors are to monitor the animals with technology, keep track of their movements, protect the animals and ensure that the fencing and materials in the reserve are not tampered with.

Without these brave people, the animals would be vulnerable to attack from high tech poachers. Especially in the case of animals like Miss T.

MONTHLY COSTS
  1.  APU running costs including salaries are approximately between R200 000 – R250 000 per month.
  2.  Our Rhino Monitors cost us around R30 000 per month.

ANTI POACHING UNIT

The Anti Poaching Unit is as essential to the reserve as oxygen to breathing. The roles performed by these wildlife warriors are to monitor the animals with technology, keep track of their movements, protect the animals and ensure that the fencing and materials in the reserve are not tampered with.

Without these brave people, the animals would be vulnerable to attack from high tech poachers. Especially in the case of animals like Miss T.

MONTHLY COSTS
  1.  APU running costs including salaries are approximately between R200 000 – R250 000 per month.
  2.  Our Rhino Monitors cost us around R30 000 per month.

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MATERIALS AND MAINTENANCE

The reserve covers 23,000 acres of land which needs to be fenced and maintained. Keeping the fence intact to form a barrier between the wildlife and potential threats is no easy task.

The wildlife management also takes into account land aspects that need to be considered for the protection and wellbeing of the area and the wildlife, such as burning breaks and protection against erosion. This all comes at the cost of teams that take care of maintenance and fencing along with the vehicles and equipment needed.

Without these people, the reserve would not be the wildlife haven that it is today, where we are able to protect and care for the land and life that lives on it.

MONTHLY COSTS
  1. Reserve fuel costs average on R60 000 per month for all our vehicles and equipment.
  2. Fencing Teams cost us roughly around R35 000 – R40 000 per month.

HELP PROTECT A RHINO

A black rhino calf cries out into the night in terror as poachers hack the horn from her still breathing mother. In terror, she runs into the bushes away from the horror and the noises.

After being recovered by the Anti Poaching Unit and receiving medical care to nurse her back to strength, Miss T is moved to a rhino orphanage to be hand-reared. Bearing in mind this was almost a decade ago and there wasn’t as much knowledge as there is now, she was put in an enclosure with white rhino.

At the time it was normal to raise black and white rhino together, unwittingly not realising that there are some unique traits that each have.

Black rhinos are considered to have less patience and tend to graze from bushes and low hanging leaves in thickets closely surrounded and protected. White rhinos have a more relaxed nature and graze on grass in wide-open spaces.

Miss T now displays characteristics of both black and white rhino. She moved to the reserve about 6 years ago and has had a remarkable survival story; despite her hearing difficulties and the eccentricities of being a white rhino in a black rhino’s body.

Her second calf was born recently and is a beautiful, bouncy and rather goofy girl. A very talkative one at that (due to Mom not having great hearing). This remarkable rhino is raising her children to be a very new kind of rhino. One that has traits of both rhinos!

At our reserve, a rhino protection levy is included as part of each guest’s visit. There are also guest activities that add to this fund. The fund is used to ensure that the Anti Poaching Unit has the equipment, materials and training they need to be able to successfully protect these vulnerable animals.

The story of Miss T is a testament to how hard these wildlife warriors work. Without this team, our reserve would not be able to provide the necessary protection for these inhabitants.

Help fund the protection of an endangered animal. Help keep Miss T and her calf safe.

HELP PROTECT A RHINO

A black rhino calf cries out into the night in terror as poachers hack the horn from her still breathing mother. In terror, she runs into the bushes away from the horror and the noises. 

After being recovered by the Anti Poaching Unit and receiving medical care to nurse her back to strength, Miss T is moved to a rhino orphanage to be hand-reared. Bearing in mind this was almost a decade ago and there wasn’t as much knowledge as there is now, she was put in an enclosure with white rhino.

At the time it was normal to raise black and white rhino together, unwittingly not realising that there are some unique traits that each have. 

Black rhinos are considered to have less patience and tend to graze from bushes and low hanging leaves in thickets closely surrounded and protected. White rhinos have a more relaxed nature and graze on grass in wide-open spaces.

Miss T now displays characteristics of both black and white rhino. She moved to the reserve about 6 years ago and has had a remarkable survival story; despite her hearing difficulties and the eccentricities of being a white rhino in a black rhino’s body. 

Her second calf was born recently and is a beautiful, bouncy and rather goofy girl. A very talkative one at that (due to Mom not having great hearing). This remarkable rhino is raising her children to be a very new kind of rhino. One that has traits of both rhinos! 

At our reserve, a rhino protection levy is included as part of each guest’s visit. There are also guest activities that add to this fund. The fund is used to ensure that the Anti Poaching Unit has the equipment, materials and training they need to be able to successfully protect these vulnerable animals. 

The story of Miss T is a testament to how hard these wildlife warriors work. Without this team, our reserve would not be able to provide the necessary protection for these inhabitants. 

Help fund the protection of an endangered animal. Help keep Miss T and her calf safe.